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Most common budgie diseases

6:37:00 PM 0
With good nutrition and care, budgies can live for 15 to 18 years. To keep your bird healthy, make sure he has a veterinary exam once a year. Here are 10 of the most common diseases the birds suffer from: 

common diseases the birds



Egg Incubation period

Egg Incubation period

3:10:00 AM 0
EGG INCUBATION PERIOD


Amazon
Days
Blue-Fronted
Cuban
Green-Cheeked
Hispaniolan
Lilac-Crowned
Puerto Rican 
Red-Lored
Spectacled (White Fronted)
Yellow-Naped
White Fronted
26
26-28
24
25
26
25-27
25-26
24
28-29
24-25
Cassowary
Twin-Wattled49-56
Chicken
Bantam 
Large Fowl
19-21
21
Cockatiel
Cockatiel18-20
Cockatoo
Bare-Eyed 
Black
Blue-Eyed
Citron Crested 
Galah
Gang-Gang
Glossy
Goffin's
Greater Sulphur 
Leadbeater's
Lesser Sulphur 
Medium Sulphur
Moluccan
Palm
Philippine Red-Vented 
Red-Tailed Black 
Slender-Billed
Triton
Umbrella
23-24
28
30
25-26
22-24
30
29
25
27-28
26
24-25
26-27
28-29
28-30
24
30
23-24
27-28
28
Conure
Blue-Crowned 
Blue-Throated
Brown-Throated
Dusky-Headed
Green-Cheeked
Nanday 

Orange-Fronted
Patagonian
Pearly
Sun
White-Eared
23
24-26
23
23
22-24
21-23

30
24-25
25
28
27
Duck
Domestic
Muscovy
Ornamental
28 
35
22-30
Emu
Emu57-62
Flamingo
Lesser
Greater
28
30-32
Goose
Goose29-31
Guinea Fowl
Helmeted
Vulturine
24-25
25-26
Hornbill
Red-Billed30
Jungle Fowl
Ceylon
Ceylon Spur Fowl
Green
Grey
Red
18-20
22-23
21
20-21
19-21
Kingfisher
Eurasian19-21
Lorikeet
Fairy
Goldie's
Johnstone's
Little
Masena's
Meyer's
Musk
Ornate
Purple-Crowned
Red-Flanked
Scaly Breasted
Stella's
Swainson's
Varied
Weber's
25
24
21-23
22
23-26
23-24
25
26-28
22
25
23
26-27
25-26
22
27
Lory
Black
Black Capped
Blue-Crowned
Chattering
Collared
Dusky
Duyvenbode's
Ornate
Papuan
Purple Naped
Rainbow
Red (Moluccan)
Tahitian
Violet Necked
Yellow-Backed Chattering 
Yellow Streaked
25-27
24
23
26
30
24
24
27
21
24-26
25-26
24
25
27
26
24
Lovebird 
Black-Cheeked
Black-Winged
Fischer's
Grey-Headed
Masked
Nyasa
Peach-Faced
Red-Faced
24
25
23
23
23
22
23
22
Macaw
Blue & Gold
Buffon's
Caninde
Chestnut-Fronted
Green-Winged
Hyacinth
Illiger's 
Military
Red-Bellied
Red-Fronted
Red-Shouldered
Scarlet
Yellow-Collared
26
26-27
26
28
26
26-28
26-27
26
25
26
24
26
26
Oriole

Baltimore
Golden
12-14
14-15
Ostrich 
Ostrich40-42






















































































Owl
Days
Barn 32-34
Great Horned 35
Hawk 26-30
Little Scops 24-25
Snowy 33-36
Tawny 28-30
32-34
35
26-30
24-25
33-36
28-30
Parakeet
Alexandrine
Barred
Budgerigar
Canary-Winged
Derbyan
Quaker
Red-Fronted 
Rose-Ringed 
Long-Tailed
Malabar 
Moustached 
Sierra
Yellow-Fronted
26-27
18
18
26
26
23
20
23-24
24
27
25-26
28
20
Parrot
African Grey 
Amboina King
Australian King
Blue-Bonnet
Blue-Headed
Blue-Winged
Bourke's
Brown-Headed
Ceylon Hanging
Double-Eyed Fig
Eclectus
Golden-Shouldered 
Green-Winged King
Hawk-Headed
Jardine's
Mallee-Ringneck
Meyers
Orange-Bellied
Paradise
Pesquet's
Phillipine Blue-Naped
Phillipine Hanging
Pileated 
Princess 
Red-Rumped
Red-Winged
Rock 
Salvadori's Fig 
Senegal
South American Red Capped 
Superb
Swift 
Timneh African Grey
Turquoise
Vernal Hanging
White-Capped
28
20
20-21
19
24-27
18
18
26
19
18-19
28
19
20
28
25-26
20
24-25
21
21
26-29
26
20
24
20
21
21
18
23
24-25
23
20
20
26
20
22 
26-28
Parrotlet
Blue-Winged
Pacific
  18
17
Partridge
Chukar
English
Gray
Hungarian
Red-Legged
Rock
23
23
23-25
24
23-25
24-26
Peafowl
Congo
Green
Indian
26-28
28
27-28
Pheasant
Amherst
Blood 
Blue-Eared
Blyth's Tragopan
Brown-Eared
Bronze-Tailed
Bulwer's Wattled 
Cabot's Tragopan
Cheer
Common 
Congo Peacock 
Copper
Crested-Argus 
Crested Fireback 
Crestless Fireback 
Edward's
Elliot's
Germain's Peacock 
Golden
Great Argus
Grey Peacock
Green
Himalayan Monal 
Hume's Bar-Tailed 
Imperial
Kalij
Koklass 
Lady Amherst's 
Malayan Peacock 
Peafowl
Reeve's
Rothschild's Peacock
Salvadori's
Satyr Tragopan
Siamese Fireback
Silver
Swinhoe's 
Temminck's Tragopan
Western Tragopan
White Eared
 
23
28
26-28
28
26-27
22
25
28
26
24-25
28
24-25
25
24
23-24
21-24
25
22
23
24-25
22
24-25
28
27-28
25
23-25
21-22
22
22
28
24-25
22
22
28
24-25
25
25
28
28
24
 

Pigeon
Rock 
Wood
17-19
17
 
Quail
Barred
Bearded Tree 
Black-Throated Bobwhite 
Bobwhite 
Brown
California
Chinese Painted 
Crested
Douglas 
Elegant
Eurasian 
Gambel's
Harlequin
Japanese
Jungle Bush
Mearn's 
Mountain 
Painted Bush
Rain
Rock Bush
Scaled
Spot-Winged Wood 
Stubble
22-23
28-30
24
22
18
22-23
16
23
22
22
17-20
22
14-18
18
21
24-25
24-25
21
18-19
18
22-23
26-27
18-21
Rhea
Common36-40
Swan
Bewick's 
Black
Black Necked
Coscoroba
Mute
Trumpeter
Whistling
Whooper
30
36
36
35
37
33
36
33
Woodpecker 
Black
Great Spotted 
Northern Three-Toed
  12-14
16
14



































































Canary care in summer

3:08:00 AM 0
We hope your breeding season was successful and that your flight cages are teeming with active youngsters jumping from perch to perch. It's a wonderful sight and the result of much hard work on your part, not to mention unyielding dedication by the parents to their offspring.

Canary care in summer

Basic Methods of Bird Care

5:50:00 PM 0
Like cats and dogs, birds also need company and affection from its caregiver. Therefore, you must give a considerable time for your birds; otherwise, you will find major behavioral changes, if abandoned for long hours by you. Below are given few bird care tips for you. 

Desert songbirds may face expanding threat of lethal dehydration

1:09:00 PM 0
A new study of songbird dehydration and survival risk during heat waves in the United States desert Southwest suggests that some birds are at risk of lethal dehydration and mass die-offs when water is scarce, and the risk is expected to increase as climate change advances.

Desert songbirds may face expanding threat of lethal dehydration
Credit: University of New Mexico/Tom Kennedy


Using physiological data, hourly temperature maps and modeling, first author Tom Albright at the University of Nevada, Reno, with Blair Wolf at the University of New Mexico and Alexander Gerson at the University of Massachusetts Amherst investigated how rates of evaporative water loss varied in five bird species with varied body mass. They mapped potential effects of current and future heat waves on lethal dehydration risk for songbirds in the Southwest and how rapidly this can occur in each species. Details are in today's issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Gerson brings expertise in avian heat tolerance physiology to these studies. One question he and colleagues addressed is whether some birds are more susceptible and at risk from heat exposure than others. They looked at the lesser goldfinch, house finch, cactus wren, Abert's towhee and curve-billed thrasher, representing "a wide range of body sizes," Gerson notes. They found the small species lose water faster than large, making them particularly susceptible to lethal dehydration.

The researchers state, "Our models reveal that increasing air temperatures and heat wave occurrence will potentially have important impacts on the water balance, daily activity and geographic distribution of arid-zone birds. Impacts may be exacerbated by chronic effects and interactions with other environmental changes. This work underscores the importance of acute risks of high temperatures, particularly for small-bodied species, and suggests conservation of thermal refugia and water sources."

Wolf explains, "Birds are susceptible to heat stress in two ways. When it's really hot, they simply can't evaporate enough water to stay cool, overheat and die of heat stroke. In other cases, the high rates of evaporative water loss needed to stay cool deplete their body water pools to lethal levels and birds die of dehydration. This is the stressor we focused on in this study."

He adds, "These estimates suggest that some regions of the desert will be uninhabitable for many species in the future and that future high temperature events could depopulate whole regions."

Gerson says he and the team measured water loss rates in response to temperature with a focus on air temperatures that exceed the animal's body temperature of 40 degrees C. (104 degrees F.) "At about 40 C, they start panting, which increases the rate of water loss very rapidly," he says.

"Most animals can only tolerate water losses that result in 15 or 20 percent loss of body mass before they die," Gerson adds. "So an animal experiencing peak temperatures during a hot summer day, with no access to water, isn't going to make it more than a few hours. Once we have these types of profiles for a number of different species, we can determine differential survival rates which will then drive differences in the overall avian community structure."

Gerson points out, "What we were able to do here is to use individual level physiology data to inform biogeographic models so we can better understand the impact of high temperatures on these avian communities. This is a big step forward to understanding local extirpation. It will raise a lot of other questions, but our contribution will help others look at how community structure might change in the future."

The news does not look good for some species, the biologist acknowledges, "but this study will give us a new tool to try to inform our conservation efforts to try to save these species, or at least understand the impact better on the overall ecosystem. You have to understand the severity of the problem before you can do anything about it."

One message for conservation is that climate refugia may become increasingly important. Further understanding of microclimates will help: mountaintops, trees and washes with shade might be very important in management plans for certain vulnerable species. Birds with a wider range such as house finches and lesser goldfinches might fare better, Gerson notes, because they can survive in a number of ecosystems. But specialists such as the curve-billed thrasher and Abert's towhee have more specific habitat needs and face higher risk.

"Using this type of data, managers identifying the best refugia can have a better idea of the temperature profile that will be suitable for these birds," he says.

Albright says this work "shows that in these hot desert systems for these species, we have a potentially devastating mechanism that can lead to die-offs for some species."

The authors point out that this work is part of a larger effort by this team to look at the biology of birds in the hottest places on Earth related to a real, current threat of massive avian die-offs occurring now in Australia and South Africa, for example.

Source: Phys.Org

Oldest known squawk box suggests dinosaurs likely did not sing

3:37:00 AM 0
The oldest known vocal organ of a bird has been found in an Antarctic fossil of a relative of ducks and geese that lived more than 66 million years ago during the age of dinosaurs.

 

More interesting tidbits about birds

8:11:00 PM 0
Bird lovers know that these inquisitive and social creatures make ideal pets that can provide plenty of entertainment and companionship. While all birds need basic housing, nutritious food and plenty of watchful care, it is important to understand the features that are unique to each species that may affect their health and happiness. Whether you are considering a pet bird or already have one of your own, check out these interesting tidbits about birds that can provide more insight into their behavior.



Study: Female birds call the shots in divorce

6:44:00 PM 0
Research is shedding new light on the causes of divorce in monogamous year-round territorial birds. A Monash University study of the endangered Purple-crowned Fairy-wren has discovered the females are calling the shots when it comes to breaking up.

Female Purple-crowned Fairy-wren is pictured. Credit: Kaspar Delhey, Monash University

 Want a Talking Bird? Learn Which Birds Love to Talk

Want a Talking Bird? Learn Which Birds Love to Talk

5:24:00 PM 0
Spending a few minutes chatting with a talking bird can brighten your day, and adding a bird to your family will provide a fun opportunity to enjoy the bonds that form when your feathered companion can talk. Many types of birds love to talk and their styles can vary according to their species as well as their temperament. 

While some birds may be able to memorize a few words, others can carry on full conversations. Here are the top pet bird types that have the ability to learn to talk along with their defining characteristics to help you decide which one will best fit your lifestyle.

Converse With a Conure

Conures are known for having the smallest vocabulary out of the parrot family. However, what they lack in words, they make up for in personality. Conures have a loud, attention-getting voice, and they sound more like a bird than other species. Although they can reproduce the human voice to some degree, you may also hear them chatter in bird talk while maintaining a human-like rhythm. They also have a surprisingly strong ability to mimic many different kinds of sounds, and your conure can keep you in giggles as they sneeze, chortle and chuckle.

Query a Quaker

Quakers have tons of personality and many bird lovers claim that their quaker can respond as if they understand the entire conversation. Perhaps this is due to their impeccable timing, which indicates that they may have some understanding of the intricacies of human language. For example, you may find your quaker telling you "good night" as you turn off a light, or they may say "thank you" when you give them some food. Quakers are full of surprises and this is one talking bird that can keep the one-liners coming.

Babble with a Budgie

Budgies often get overlooked when it comes to talking birds, but according to the Guinness Book of World records, a budgie has earned the distinction of being "The Most Talking Bird" with a vocabulary of more than 1700 words. If you are considering getting a budgie, then be sure it is a male since females do not talk. Additionally, budgies pick up new words from their environment and are constantly adding to their vocabulary. Try leaving the radio or television on during quiet periods of the day and you will be amazed at how much your budgie can learn to say.

Gab with an African Grey

African greys are quieter than a conure, yet they also have the ability to reproduce different voices depending upon whom they are mimicking. For example, your African grey may sing a song in the voice of your favorite musical artist, or they could squawk "hello" in your kid's voice so well that you think they are in the room. As you teach your grey to talk, keep in mind that they learn words faster when emotions are attached to them. So, get excited when you tell them hello or call them a pretty bird.

Talking birds are a great addition to any home, and you can spend hours training your bird to communicate effectively. Whether you prefer a chatterbox or an occasional bit of birdie wisdom, there is a type of talking bird that will fit your preferences. Just remember that talking to your bird frequently is the best way to expand their vocabulary which means that you can get started from the moment you bring your new bird home.